How to use this Collaborative Collection

Ongoing processes of colonialism have profoundly shaped and affected relations between the Canadian State and First Nations, and non-Indigenous and Indigenous peoples. Settler consciousness, which permeates through nearly every aspect of mainstream society, has allowed colonial practices and narratives to remain dominant within Canada.

What follows is a collaborative collection of past, present, and ongoing initiatives from across the territory now known as Canada, which contribute to the process of understanding and transforming settler consciousness, and rebuilding relationships between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples who share this land.

To navigate the collection, which is presented in the form of a prolific blog, you can select particular topics and sectors using the Categories and Tags sections on the right sidebar.

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The Decolonizing Lens

The University of Manitoba is hosting this event, where they will screen and discuss the work of Indigenous women artists who call attention and respond to the crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirited People in Canada. There will be two screenings on Monday, April 10: 2:30–4pm, University of Manitoba (University College room 240), and 7–9:30pm, Cinematheque. The event is free and open to all. Artist Jaime Black will be in attendance for discussion.  Continue reading

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Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop: Professional Learning Experience

Reconciliation Canada is pleased to announce that its next workshop will take place in Vancouver on April 27th, 2017 from 8:30am-12:30pm. Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop: Professional Learning Experience is a half-day workshop that will provide business and community leaders with the opportunity to engage in dialogue and reflect on the core values of reconciliation, allowing for a new generation of leaders who consciously and thoughtfully choose to live and work in reconciliation. Continue reading

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Reconciliation Pole raised at University of British Columbia

The Reconciliation Pole, a 55-foot totem pole carved by acclaimed Haida artist 7idansuu “Edenshaw” James Hart, was installed at a place of honour at UBC on April 1, 2017. The ceremony, taking place on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people, began at 1 p.m. with the pole raising beginning at 2:30 p.m. on the Main Mall between Agronomy Road and Thunderbird Boulevard. The artist, a master carver and Haida hereditary chief, created a storyline on the pole, which shows the periods before, during, and after the Indian residential school system, a racist and assimilationist system ran in tandem by the Canadian government, religious institutions and the education system, beginning in the 1800s and ending with the last school closure in 1996. Continue reading

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Kina maamwigdoo-wiikendaasmin – We Are All Learning Together, a Truth and Reconciliation public education series

The demand for cultural training has increased since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommended 94 calls to action in 2015 including cultural competency training for healthcare and judicial professionals. Recently in North Bay (Northern Ontario), cultural trainer George Couchie, a Nipissing First Nation (NFN) member, worked closely with North Bay Mayor Al McDonald and NFN Chief Scott McLeod to create a learning experience about Canada’s real history and Indigenous culture. Continue reading

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#callresponse

Strategically centering Indigenous women as vital presences across multiple platforms, #callresponse is a multifaceted project that includes a website, social media platform, touring exhibition and catalogue (forthcoming in 2017). The purpose of #callresponse is to support the work of Indigenous North American women and artists through local art commissions that incite dialogue and catalyze action between individuals, communities, territories and institutions. To stand together across sovereign territories as accomplices in awakened solidarity with all our relations both human and non. The goal is to ground art in responsible action, value lived experience, and demonstrate ongoing commitment to accountability and community building. To respond to re/conciliation as a present day negotiation and reconstruction of communities in the aftermath of colonial trauma. Continue reading

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The Next 150, On Indigenous Lands: Congress 2017

Canada’s sesquicentennial offers an important opportunity to critically reflect on the nation’s past and seek to build a better, more inclusive and just future. Congress 2017 invites participants to acknowledge the country’s colonial past and present practices, and forge new relationships towards positive change and reconciliation. Building upon the insights, contributions and recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the Congress 2017 theme “The Next 150, On Indigenous Lands” aims to mark the achievements and character of all peoples in Canada. Continue reading

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Unify Toronto Dialogues presents: Indigenous Rights Holders, Indigenous Land Defenders

This session of Unify Toronto Dialogues will explore how exercising Indigenous Rights and re-establishing Indigenous governance are the best, if not the only, hope for protecting the land and water from further assault and beginning the process of regeneration. Presenters will look at how realizing this hope requires spiritual, political, technical and social action. Continue reading

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